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Grant Wood’s career consists of far more than his iconic…


Grant Wood (1891–1942), Death on the Ridge Road, 1935. © Figge Art Museum, successors to the Estate of Nan Wood Graham/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY


Grant Wood (1891–1942), Saturday Night Bath, 1937. © Figge Art Museum, successors to the Estate of Nan Wood Graham/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY


Grant Wood (1891–1942), Woman with Plants, 1929. © Figge Art Museum, successors to the Estate of Nan Wood Graham/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

Grant Wood’s career consists of far more than his iconic painting American Gothic—the double portrait of a pitchfork-wielding farmer and a woman commonly presumed to be his wife. From decorative art and Impressionist oils to murals, landscapes, and portraiture, Wood crafted images that speak both to American identity and to the estrangement and isolation of modern life. His retrospective debuts at the Whitney today. Explore the exhibition, take a peek at the catalogue, and more on whitney.org

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The Whitney in New York houses one of the world’s foremost collections of modern and contemporary American art.
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Grant Wood’s career consists of far more than his iconic…Grant Wood’s career consists of far more than his iconic…Grant Wood’s career consists of far more than his iconic…Grant Wood’s career consists of far more than his iconic…Grant Wood’s career consists of far more than his iconic…


Grant Wood (1891–1942), Death on the Ridge Road, 1935. © Figge Art Museum, successors to the Estate of Nan Wood Graham/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY


Grant Wood (1891–1942), Saturday Night Bath, 1937. © Figge Art Museum, successors to the Estate of Nan Wood Graham/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY


Grant Wood (1891–1942), Woman with Plants, 1929. © Figge Art Museum, successors to the Estate of Nan Wood Graham/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

Grant Wood’s career consists of far more than his iconic painting American Gothic—the double portrait of a pitchfork-wielding farmer and a woman commonly presumed to be his wife. From decorative art and Impressionist oils to murals, landscapes, and portraiture, Wood crafted images that speak both to American identity and to the estrangement and isolation of modern life. His retrospective debuts at the Whitney today. Explore the exhibition, take a peek at the catalogue, and more on whitney.org


Grant Wood (1891–1942), Death on the Ridge Road, 1935. © Figge Art Museum, successors to the Estate of Nan Wood Graham/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY


Grant Wood (1891–1942), Saturday Night Bath, 1937. © Figge Art Museum, successors to the Estate of Nan Wood Graham/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY


Grant Wood (1891–1942), Woman with Plants, 1929. © Figge Art Museum, successors to the Estate of Nan Wood Graham/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

Grant Wood’s career consists of far more than his iconic painting American Gothic—the double portrait of a pitchfork-wielding farmer and a woman commonly presumed to be his wife. From decorative art and Impressionist oils to murals, landscapes, and portraiture, Wood crafted images that speak both to American identity and to the estrangement and isolation of modern life. His retrospective debuts at the Whitney today. Explore the exhibition, take a peek at the catalogue, and more on whitney.org

Grant Wood’s career consists of far more than his iconic…

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2018-03-03T03:19:20+00:00March 3rd, 2018|Categories: Inspiration, News|Tags: |