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Your weekend plans: Enjoy a walk down the High Line and check…


Do Ho Suh (b. 1962), Installation view of 95 Horatio Street, 2017. Collection of the artist; courtesy Lehmann Maupin, New York, and Victoria Miro, London. Photograph by Ronald Amstutz


Do Ho Suh (b. 1962), Installation view of 95 Horatio Street, 2017. Collection of the artist; courtesy Lehmann Maupin, New York, and Victoria Miro, London. Photograph by Ronald Amstutz

Your weekend plans: Enjoy a walk down the High Line and check out 95 Horatio Street—a site-specific work by Do Ho Suh at the corner of Washington and Gansevoort Streets across from the Museum. For the work, Suh mines the history of the Meatpacking District to visually reconnect this space with the former railway that once occupied the neighborhood. Although today the High Line ends at Gansevoort Street, it previously continued downtown, running through various industrial buildings. The 95 Horatio Street site was formerly the Manhattan Refrigerating Company, which had a private siding for the railway, allowing direct access to St. John’s Terminal further downtown. Suh’s digitally rendered image evokes the history of the site but also connects to the current repurposed use of the High Line, which affords a unique view of his project at the southern terminus. Next up for the billboard: a new work by Christine Sun Kim will be installed on Monday!

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Your weekend plans: Enjoy a walk down the High Line and check…Your weekend plans: Enjoy a walk down the High Line and check…Your weekend plans: Enjoy a walk down the High Line and check…Your weekend plans: Enjoy a walk down the High Line and check…Your weekend plans: Enjoy a walk down the High Line and check…


Do Ho Suh (b. 1962), Installation view of 95 Horatio Street, 2017. Collection of the artist; courtesy Lehmann Maupin, New York, and Victoria Miro, London. Photograph by Ronald Amstutz


Do Ho Suh (b. 1962), Installation view of 95 Horatio Street, 2017. Collection of the artist; courtesy Lehmann Maupin, New York, and Victoria Miro, London. Photograph by Ronald Amstutz

Your weekend plans: Enjoy a walk down the High Line and check out 95 Horatio Street—a site-specific work by Do Ho Suh at the corner of Washington and Gansevoort Streets across from the Museum. For the work, Suh mines the history of the Meatpacking District to visually reconnect this space with the former railway that once occupied the neighborhood. Although today the High Line ends at Gansevoort Street, it previously continued downtown, running through various industrial buildings. The 95 Horatio Street site was formerly the Manhattan Refrigerating Company, which had a private siding for the railway, allowing direct access to St. John’s Terminal further downtown. Suh’s digitally rendered image evokes the history of the site but also connects to the current repurposed use of the High Line, which affords a unique view of his project at the southern terminus. Next up for the billboard: a new work by Christine Sun Kim will be installed on Monday!


Do Ho Suh (b. 1962), Installation view of 95 Horatio Street, 2017. Collection of the artist; courtesy Lehmann Maupin, New York, and Victoria Miro, London. Photograph by Ronald Amstutz


Do Ho Suh (b. 1962), Installation view of 95 Horatio Street, 2017. Collection of the artist; courtesy Lehmann Maupin, New York, and Victoria Miro, London. Photograph by Ronald Amstutz

Your weekend plans: Enjoy a walk down the High Line and check out 95 Horatio Street—a site-specific work by Do Ho Suh at the corner of Washington and Gansevoort Streets across from the Museum. For the work, Suh mines the history of the Meatpacking District to visually reconnect this space with the former railway that once occupied the neighborhood. Although today the High Line ends at Gansevoort Street, it previously continued downtown, running through various industrial buildings. The 95 Horatio Street site was formerly the Manhattan Refrigerating Company, which had a private siding for the railway, allowing direct access to St. John’s Terminal further downtown. Suh’s digitally rendered image evokes the history of the site but also connects to the current repurposed use of the High Line, which affords a unique view of his project at the southern terminus. Next up for the billboard: a new work by Christine Sun Kim will be installed on Monday!

Your weekend plans: Enjoy a walk down the High Line and check…

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2018-01-27T03:19:18+00:00January 27th, 2018|Categories: Inspiration, News|Tags: |