By nathan

A Selection of Our Favorite Wooden Hide-Outs from Around the World

In search of a life in harmony with nature, many people around the world are turning to cabins away from the city’s rat-race. Some are rustic and antiquated; others incorporate new structural technology and cutting-edge architectural design. However, these highly-personalized retreats are united by a shared respect for the wilderness in which they are situated.

Our recent release Hide and Seek is a compendium of the places people go for refuge from the urban sprawl. The book showcases cabins, hide-outs, and getaways from around the world. Browse 10 of our favorite escapes for a weekend in the woods below.

WALDSETZKASTEN

The intricate wooden structure of this solid spruce cabin in Vorarlberg, Austria is home to an association promoting education in outdoor settings. Designed by Bernd Riegger, Waldsetzkasten is lined with cubbies for the children to leave treats for the forest animals and showcase the souvenirs that they collect during their expeditions into the wild.

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REFUGE

Affectionately known as Refuge, this wooden farmhouse in Flanders, Belgium is was designed to delicately link the sleek interior and the classic Flemish countryside. During the winter, sliding doors offer refuge from the cold and harsh winds, and the wooden lattice opens the cabin up for a free-flowing breeze. Wim Goes Architectuur designed the building with a cantilevered wooden pier for summertime lakeside lazing.

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SUMMER HOUSE GRØGAARD AND SLAATTELID

Tucked in between a forest and a lake on the Kragerø archipelago in Norway, this small timber summer house emerges from the rocks with rounded arms that echo the form of the preexisting landscape. Designed by Knut Hjeltnes Architects, the house’s twin wings frame a large glass volume at the center that overlooks the sea, as well as the wooden path that zigzags to the waterfront.

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CLIFF HOUSE

The Cliff House is embedded into the bluff overlooking Loch Dunvegan on the Isle of Skye. Taking full advantage of the impressive vista, Dualchas Architects included a wall made entirely of glass showcasing the natural beauty of the Scottish seaside, as well as a floor-to-ceiling window by the bathtub for guests to watch the family of chickens that live on the estate.

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SPLIT VIEW MOUNTAIN LODGE

Reiulf Ramstan Arkitekter designed this holiday home on the slope of a popular ski valley in Østlandet, Norway. The Split View Mountain Lodge is divided into three connected branches, pairing an element of intimacy with the breathtaking alpine views.

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CASA C

Strict local preservation rules required Camponovo Baumgarner Architekten to preserve the outer façade of this 100-year-old hay barn as they refurbished its interior. The result is a striking darken wood exterior in stark contrast with the cabin’s bright and open inner structure in the historic mountain village of Valais, Switzerland.

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VEGA COTTAGE

The harsh landscape and near-Arctic climate of Trødelag, Norway necessitates sturdy structures that can weather the difficult terrain. For the Vega Cottage, Kolman Boye Architects borrowed from the vernacular of local shelters to create this two-level home with wide vistas and an organic relationship to the wide sheets of bedrock.

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BIVACCO LUCA VUERICH

This diminuative A-frame cabin rests on the rugged landscape of the Julian Alps as they cross through Friuli-Venezia Giulia, Italy. The modular wooden shelter rests around two-and-a-half kilometers above sea level and was built in a single day. The cabin takes its name from a deceased climber whose family commissioned the refuge from Giovanni Pesamosca Architetto.

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ALPINE CABIN

This remote forest cabin in British Columbia is only accessible via a gravel road for five months of the year—visitors must travel by foot or toboggan during heavy winter snowfall. The home’s rugged materials are left with raw forms and finishes, and are designed to developed a beautiful color palette as the house ages.

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HAUS AM MOOR

Built in the pastoral plains of Vorarlberg, Austria, this wooden summer home was built using 60 locally sourced trees. The interior’s simple and clean form is derived from the traditional houses of the area, but also incorporates a deep reverance for nature.

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Read more here:: 10 Cozy Cabins for a Weekend Getaway