All images courtesy of Musicity and the Low Line.

What if we could hear the city in new ways, as well as see it (and often, for better or worse, smell it)?

The Musicity x Low Line project makes that a reality, seeing music and songs composed and recorded by 15 artists specifically for 15 buildings and sites along the path of the railway viaduct through Bankside, London Bridge.

The songs can only be accessed at the actual site; so that you can take in how the sound compositions relate to each building or place within the capital.

Described as “a new way of touring an historic part of London and all about the links between music and architecture,” the project was initiated by BBC Radio 3 Late Junction’s Nick Luscombe; and among the spaces that sounds have been created for are Old Union Yard Arches, Borough Market, Bermondsey Street Tunnel, London Bridge Station, Vinegar Yard, and The Biscuit Factory.

The Shard

The Shard

Low Line

Low Line

The Low Line

The Low Line

The Musicity app is free to download, and is the only way of hearing the tracks—users scan a code at each site and listen to it digitally. The idea is that it encourages people to seek out music in a sort of psycho-geographical capacity while also celebrating the heritage of the railway arches across south London’s Low Line.

Among the artists who’ve created sound pieces for the project are multi-instrumentalist Erland Cooper; London-based French composer, artist and musician Lola de la Mata; electro-acoustic composer Thomas Stone; vocalist Szjerdene; live jungle and drum & bass mash-up artist Suitman Jungle; and Japanese-born, classically trained violinist and composer Chihiro Ono.

Southwark Road entrance to Flat Iron Square and W.T.P.A. (Photography Credit David Loftus)

Southwark Road entrance to Flat Iron Square and W.T.P.A. (Photography Credit David Loftus)

The Low Line

The Low Line

London Bridge Station

London Bridge Station

The Low Line

The Low Line

“It’s a joy to be bringing new music to such a culturally rich part of the city,” says Luscombe. “Following the Low Line is a fascinating, surprising way of seeing an intriguing part of London. We’re encouraging audiences to venture out, explore architecture, neighbourhoods and the urban environment with a bespoke soundtrack.”

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Author:

Emily Gosling

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