Photos by Eugeni Bach

All-around lovely dude and pal of CB Anthony Burrill is usually synonymous with his bold, distinctive letterpress work.

Lately, though, he’s turned his hand to something rather different, working with architect Eugeni Bach and students at Elisava University in Barcelona to build a summer pavilion.

The structure, housed on the school’s roof terrace, was created by a large team comprising students from the master’s programme at the university’s School of Design and Engineering as part of an ongoing series of workshops between the engineering students and those from the graphic design masters course; counting towards all students’ coursework.

Photos by Eugeni Bach

Photos by Eugeni Bach

Created Changing Rooms-style in just five days under the guidance of Burrill and Bach, the pavilion uses pine strips to make a square shape.

The upper section of the pavilion is covered with graphic panels design by the students alongside Burrill. The brief stated that only simple materials and a small number of tools could be used; but that the space must be robust enough to host a number of different exhibitions, events and social gatherings over the summer months. The approach was inspired by Italian designer Enzo Mari, known for a “pragmatic approach,” according to the school.

Photos by Eugeni Bach

Photos by Eugeni Bach

Photos by Eugeni Bach

Photos by Eugeni Bach

“With this workshop, our aim was to focus on what it meant to ‘deliver’ a project and empower the students with the skills to be a designer as well as a maker,” says Bach, founder of Anna&Eugeni Bach Architects. “There are many decisions to take when delivering a building in a public environment in a short time span and we wanted to expose the students to this.”

Burrill adds: “the project has given the students a hands-on experience that they would not normally have on their design course”.

Photos by Eugeni Bach

Photos by Eugeni Bach

The final piece has uses 660 wooden sticks to create a mesh-like roof structure, and within the structure flat panels of waterproof MDF are fixed in angled positions. Each design student is given a flat white panel on which to apply their work.
 
“The theme of the project is ‘creativity within simple means’,” says the school. “This means using limited materials to produce your design, exploring how to be ingenious and engaging with a small number of options.”

Photos by Eugeni Bach

Photos by Eugeni Bach

Creative Boom Go to Source
Author:

Emily Gosling

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