blakegopnik:

THE WEEKLY PIC: This
is a small detail from an installation shot of “You See I Am Here After All,” one of Zoe Leonard’s agglomerations of old postcards
of Niagara Falls (this one has 3,851 cards) which are standouts in her retrospective at the Whitney
Museum
in New York.

They are all about a pre-digital moment in our
production and consumption of images. Looking
at them, however, I was suddently struck by how much Leonard must have depended
on digital culture (eBay etc.) to collect so many near-identical vintage cards.

I once argued that Ansel Adams’s images of machine-free
nature
were in fact about the modern technologies ­– of cars and cameras and
darkrooms – that allowed them to happen.
Could it be that many works of art, including Leonard’s postcard-piles,
are more about what’s left out than what’s included? (Collection of the artist, courtesy Galerie Gisela Capitain, Cologne; photo by Bill Jacobson, New York)

Go to Source
Author:
The Whitney in New York houses one of the world’s foremost collections of modern and contemporary American art.
Go to Source
Author:
blakegopnik:

THE WEEKLY PIC: This
is a small detail from an…blakegopnik:

THE WEEKLY PIC: This
is a small detail from an…blakegopnik:

THE WEEKLY PIC: This
is a small detail from an…blakegopnik:

THE WEEKLY PIC: This
is a small detail from an…blakegopnik:

THE WEEKLY PIC: This
is a small detail from an…

blakegopnik:

THE WEEKLY PIC: This
is a small detail from an installation shot of “You See I Am Here After All,” one of Zoe Leonard’s agglomerations of old postcards
of Niagara Falls (this one has 3,851 cards) which are standouts in her retrospective at the Whitney
Museum
in New York.

They are all about a pre-digital moment in our
production and consumption of images. Looking
at them, however, I was suddently struck by how much Leonard must have depended
on digital culture (eBay etc.) to collect so many near-identical vintage cards.

I once argued that Ansel Adams’s images of machine-free
nature
were in fact about the modern technologies ­– of cars and cameras and
darkrooms – that allowed them to happen.
Could it be that many works of art, including Leonard’s postcard-piles,
are more about what’s left out than what’s included? (Collection of the artist, courtesy Galerie Gisela Capitain, Cologne; photo by Bill Jacobson, New York)

blakegopnik:

THE WEEKLY PIC: This
is a small detail from an installation shot of “You See I Am Here After All,” one of Zoe Leonard’s agglomerations of old postcards
of Niagara Falls (this one has 3,851 cards) which are standouts in her retrospective at the Whitney
Museum
in New York.

They are all about a pre-digital moment in our
production and consumption of images. Looking
at them, however, I was suddently struck by how much Leonard must have depended
on digital culture (eBay etc.) to collect so many near-identical vintage cards.

I once argued that Ansel Adams’s images of machine-free
nature
were in fact about the modern technologies ­– of cars and cameras and
darkrooms – that allowed them to happen.
Could it be that many works of art, including Leonard’s postcard-piles,
are more about what’s left out than what’s included? (Collection of the artist, courtesy Galerie Gisela Capitain, Cologne; photo by Bill Jacobson, New York)

blakegopnik:

THE WEEKLY PIC: This
is a small detail from an…

Powered by WPeMatico