Don’t let the photo fool you—Standing Lincoln (1912) by artist Daniel Chester French is only about 37 inches tall. The sculpture served as a model for a 9-foot-tall memorial the artist created for the grounds of the State Capitol in Lincoln, Nebraska. With funds provided by the state legislature, the Lincoln Centennial Memorial Association commissioned the statue on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of the 16th U.S. presidents birthday. French’s sculpture depicts Lincoln delivering the Gettysburg Address; in that speech, made during the Civil War, he rallied for continued resolve in the Union battle for national unity and the abolition of slavery. French explained that he “purposely tried to represent Lincoln as bearing the burdens and perplexities and problems of the Great War.” The success of Standing Lincoln led to French’s subsequent commission for the monumental sculpture in the Lincoln Memorial in Washington D.C., which was completed in 1922. In celebration of Lincoln’s birthday, see the work in Where We Are: Selections from the Whitney’s Collection, 1900–1960

[Daniel Chester French (1850-1931), Standing Lincoln, 1912. Bronze, 37 ½ x 10 3/8 in. (95.3 x 33 x 26.4 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney 31.25]

Go to Source
Author:
The Whitney in New York houses one of the world’s foremost collections of modern and contemporary American art.
Go to Source
Author:
Don’t let the photo fool you—Standing Lincoln (1912) by artist…Don’t let the photo fool you—Standing Lincoln (1912) by artist…Don’t let the photo fool you—Standing Lincoln (1912) by artist…Don’t let the photo fool you—Standing Lincoln (1912) by artist…Don’t let the photo fool you—Standing Lincoln (1912) by artist…

Don’t let the photo fool you—Standing Lincoln (1912) by artist Daniel Chester French is only about 37 inches tall. The sculpture served as a model for a 9-foot-tall memorial the artist created for the grounds of the State Capitol in Lincoln, Nebraska. With funds provided by the state legislature, the Lincoln Centennial Memorial Association commissioned the statue on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of the 16th U.S. presidents birthday. French’s sculpture depicts Lincoln delivering the Gettysburg Address; in that speech, made during the Civil War, he rallied for continued resolve in the Union battle for national unity and the abolition of slavery. French explained that he “purposely tried to represent Lincoln as bearing the burdens and perplexities and problems of the Great War.” The success of Standing Lincoln led to French’s subsequent commission for the monumental sculpture in the Lincoln Memorial in Washington D.C., which was completed in 1922. In celebration of Lincoln’s birthday, see the work in Where We Are: Selections from the Whitney’s Collection, 1900–1960

[Daniel Chester French (1850-1931), Standing Lincoln, 1912. Bronze, 37 ½ x 10 3/8 in. (95.3 x 33 x 26.4 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney 31.25]

Don’t let the photo fool you—Standing Lincoln (1912) by artist Daniel Chester French is only about 37 inches tall. The sculpture served as a model for a 9-foot-tall memorial the artist created for the grounds of the State Capitol in Lincoln, Nebraska. With funds provided by the state legislature, the Lincoln Centennial Memorial Association commissioned the statue on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of the 16th U.S. presidents birthday. French’s sculpture depicts Lincoln delivering the Gettysburg Address; in that speech, made during the Civil War, he rallied for continued resolve in the Union battle for national unity and the abolition of slavery. French explained that he “purposely tried to represent Lincoln as bearing the burdens and perplexities and problems of the Great War.” The success of Standing Lincoln led to French’s subsequent commission for the monumental sculpture in the Lincoln Memorial in Washington D.C., which was completed in 1922. In celebration of Lincoln’s birthday, see the work in Where We Are: Selections from the Whitney’s Collection, 1900–1960

[Daniel Chester French (1850-1931), Standing Lincoln, 1912. Bronze, 37 ½ x 10 3/8 in. (95.3 x 33 x 26.4 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney 31.25]

Don’t let the photo fool you—Standing Lincoln (1912) by artist…

Powered by WPeMatico