“I have always wanted my art to service Black people—to reflect us, to relate to us, to stimulate us, to make us aware of our potential… I have learned from many people: from the restlessness and inquisitiveness of the young, from my mother, from other Black people who have struggled to better themselves…We have to create an art for liberation and for life.” —Elizabeth Catlett, born on this day in 1915.

[Elizabeth Catlett (1915–2012), My right is a future of equality with other Americans, 1947, printed 1989, from the series The Negro Woman, 1946-47 (re-titled The Black Woman, 1989). Linoleum cut: sheet, 10 5/16 × 7 ½ in. (26.2 × 19.1 cm); image, 9 1/8 × 6 1/8 in. (23.2 × 15.6 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase with funds from the Print Committee 95.203 Art © Catlett Mora Family Trust/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY]

Go to Source
Author:
The Whitney in New York houses one of the world’s foremost collections of modern and contemporary American art.
Go to Source
Author:
“I have always wanted my art to service Black people—to reflect…“I have always wanted my art to service Black people—to reflect…“I have always wanted my art to service Black people—to reflect…“I have always wanted my art to service Black people—to reflect…“I have always wanted my art to service Black people—to reflect…

“I have always wanted my art to service Black people—to reflect us, to relate to us, to stimulate us, to make us aware of our potential… I have learned from many people: from the restlessness and inquisitiveness of the young, from my mother, from other Black people who have struggled to better themselves…We have to create an art for liberation and for life.” —Elizabeth Catlett, born on this day in 1915.

[Elizabeth Catlett (1915–2012), My right is a future of equality with other Americans, 1947, printed 1989, from the series The Negro Woman, 1946-47 (re-titled The Black Woman, 1989). Linoleum cut: sheet, 10 5/16 × 7 ½ in. (26.2 × 19.1 cm); image, 9 1/8 × 6 1/8 in. (23.2 × 15.6 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase with funds from the Print Committee 95.203 Art © Catlett Mora Family Trust/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY]

“I have always wanted my art to service Black people—to reflect us, to relate to us, to stimulate us, to make us aware of our potential… I have learned from many people: from the restlessness and inquisitiveness of the young, from my mother, from other Black people who have struggled to better themselves…We have to create an art for liberation and for life.” —Elizabeth Catlett, born on this day in 1915.

[Elizabeth Catlett (1915–2012), My right is a future of equality with other Americans, 1947, printed 1989, from the series The Negro Woman, 1946-47 (re-titled The Black Woman, 1989). Linoleum cut: sheet, 10 5/16 × 7 ½ in. (26.2 × 19.1 cm); image, 9 1/8 × 6 1/8 in. (23.2 × 15.6 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase with funds from the Print Committee 95.203 Art © Catlett Mora Family Trust/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY]

“I have always wanted my art to service Black people—to reflect…

Powered by WPeMatico