By 1944, Germany had dominated Europe to keep the allies out. The Germans were constantly sending coded messages to retain their stronghold. But the brilliant minds at Bletchley Park had created Colossus, a machine which could intercept and decode the messages.

This provided the most valuable intelligence of the entire war and allowed the code-breakers to create fake messages, so convincing, the Germans moved troops away from Normandy to defend Calais. It enabled the Allies to land on the beaches of Normandy on 6 June 1944.

Seventy-five years on, Bletchley Park wanted to commemorate their contribution to D Day, and asked London studio, Rose, to create a brand identity for its new immersive exhibition.

Rose’s inspiration came from the unique ticker tape Colossus decrypted. “With this, we took the three key stages featured in the exhibition – Interception, Intelligence, Invasion – and had them printed out on the ticker tape,” says Rose. “We folded the ticker tape, replicating the typefaces used on the WWII landing craft, to form the letter ‘D’, symbolising Bletchley Park’s role in D Day from Interception to Invasion.”

Continuing the dots theme, Rose also created halftone images of photos taken on D Day and used these and the ticker tape motif across the marketing campaign and merchandise.

Rose also created a permanent memorial made from powder-coated steel, sited outside the newly restored Teleprinter Building (which houses the D Day exhibition experience), to acknowledge the vital contribution to D Day resulting from the brilliant work done at Bletchley Park.

At a conservative estimate, each year of the fighting in Europe brought on average about seven million deaths. So the significance of Bletchley Park’s contribution can be roughly quantified in terms of the number of additional lives that might have been lost without their efforts and contribution to D Day.

Creative Boom Go to Source
Author:

Katy Cowan

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