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Home » NewsBlog » “One doesn’t need a contemporary sense of gay identity to see…

“One doesn’t need a contemporary sense of gay identity to see…

“One doesn’t need a contemporary sense of gay identity to see that there is something wonderfully queer in Wood’s world. Lay aside the many images with overtly homoerotic subject matter, and you still have a large body of work in which lines are being crossed, categories jumbled and expectations confounded.” Read more on Grant Wood: American Gothic and Other Fables in the Washington Post.  

[Grant Wood (1891–1942), Spring in Town, 1941. Oil on wood, 26 x 24 1⁄2 in. (66 x 62.2 cm). Swope Art Museum, Terre Haute, Indiana 1941.30. © Figge Art Museum, successors to the Estate of Nan Wood Graham/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY]

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The Whitney in New York houses one of the world’s foremost collections of modern and contemporary American art.
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“One doesn’t need a contemporary sense of gay identity to see…“One doesn’t need a contemporary sense of gay identity to see…“One doesn’t need a contemporary sense of gay identity to see…“One doesn’t need a contemporary sense of gay identity to see…“One doesn’t need a contemporary sense of gay identity to see…

“One doesn’t need a contemporary sense of gay identity to see that there is something wonderfully queer in Wood’s world. Lay aside the many images with overtly homoerotic subject matter, and you still have a large body of work in which lines are being crossed, categories jumbled and expectations confounded.” Read more on Grant Wood: American Gothic and Other Fables in the Washington Post.  

[Grant Wood (1891–1942), Spring in Town, 1941. Oil on wood, 26 x 24 1⁄2 in. (66 x 62.2 cm). Swope Art Museum, Terre Haute, Indiana 1941.30. © Figge Art Museum, successors to the Estate of Nan Wood Graham/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY]

“One doesn’t need a contemporary sense of gay identity to see that there is something wonderfully queer in Wood’s world. Lay aside the many images with overtly homoerotic subject matter, and you still have a large body of work in which lines are being crossed, categories jumbled and expectations confounded.” Read more on Grant Wood: American Gothic and Other Fables in the Washington Post.  

[Grant Wood (1891–1942), Spring in Town, 1941. Oil on wood, 26 x 24 1⁄2 in. (66 x 62.2 cm). Swope Art Museum, Terre Haute, Indiana 1941.30. © Figge Art Museum, successors to the Estate of Nan Wood Graham/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY]

“One doesn’t need a contemporary sense of gay identity to see…

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2018-03-08T03:19:12+00:00March 8th, 2018|Categories: Inspiration, News|Tags: |
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