We remember September 11 with two Whitney Collection works by Ellsworth Kelly: Green Panel (Ground Zero) (2011) and Ground Zero (2003). Kelly imagined a large, gently sloping mound of earth covered in brilliant green grass when he conceived of a memorial Ground Zero in 2001. When the artist saw this aerial photograph of Ground Zero published in The New York Times in 2003, he was inspired to make this collage of a prospective memorial. Preserving Ground Zero as an undeveloped rectangle of green grass perfectly embodies Kelly’s interest in monochrome geometry and the landscape. When looking down from neighboring buildings on the site, viewers would see an uninterrupted expanse of color, as if looking at the ocean or sky.

[Ellsworth Kelly (1923–2015), Ground Zero, 2003. Collage on paper (newsprint). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of an anonymous donor. © Ellsworth Kelly]

[Ellsworth Kelly (1923–2015), Green Panel (Ground Zero), 2011. Painted Aluminum. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Commissioned by the Whitney Museum of American Art. © Ellsworth Kelly]

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We remember September 11 with two Whitney Collection works by…We remember September 11 with two Whitney Collection works by…We remember September 11 with two Whitney Collection works by…We remember September 11 with two Whitney Collection works by…We remember September 11 with two Whitney Collection works by…

We remember September 11 with two Whitney Collection works by Ellsworth Kelly: Green Panel (Ground Zero) (2011) and Ground Zero (2003). Kelly imagined a large, gently sloping mound of earth covered in brilliant green grass when he conceived of a memorial Ground Zero in 2001. When the artist saw this aerial photograph of Ground Zero published in The New York Times in 2003, he was inspired to make this collage of a prospective memorial. Preserving Ground Zero as an undeveloped rectangle of green grass perfectly embodies Kelly’s interest in monochrome geometry and the landscape. When looking down from neighboring buildings on the site, viewers would see an uninterrupted expanse of color, as if looking at the ocean or sky.

[Ellsworth Kelly (1923–2015), Ground Zero, 2003. Collage on paper (newsprint). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of an anonymous donor. © Ellsworth Kelly]

[Ellsworth Kelly (1923–2015), Green Panel (Ground Zero), 2011. Painted Aluminum. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Commissioned by the Whitney Museum of American Art. © Ellsworth Kelly]

We remember September 11 with two Whitney Collection works by Ellsworth Kelly: Green Panel (Ground Zero) (2011) and Ground Zero (2003). Kelly imagined a large, gently sloping mound of earth covered in brilliant green grass when he conceived of a memorial Ground Zero in 2001. When the artist saw this aerial photograph of Ground Zero published in The New York Times in 2003, he was inspired to make this collage of a prospective memorial. Preserving Ground Zero as an undeveloped rectangle of green grass perfectly embodies Kelly’s interest in monochrome geometry and the landscape. When looking down from neighboring buildings on the site, viewers would see an uninterrupted expanse of color, as if looking at the ocean or sky.

[Ellsworth Kelly (1923–2015), Ground Zero, 2003. Collage on paper (newsprint). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of an anonymous donor. © Ellsworth Kelly]

[Ellsworth Kelly (1923–2015), Green Panel (Ground Zero), 2011. Painted Aluminum. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Commissioned by the Whitney Museum of American Art. © Ellsworth Kelly]

We remember September 11 with two Whitney Collection works by…

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